Positive and Negative

Again, an ambiguous start. Lots of meanings for positive and negative.

If you have ever stuck your finger inside a Christmas light socket, or touched the tip of your tongue to the terminals of a 9-volt battery, or seen lightening, that’s the positive and negative I am talking about.

Everybody knows what positive and negative are, but like most everything else, nobody can explain it.

Our grade school textbooks show pictures of little round balls that have a ” + or -” sign stamped on for good measure. I guess that’s supposed to mean something, if you have a clue what the + or – actually means, which is where everything you learned about plus and minus, and electricity, and magnetic fields, and most everything else falls apart.

We are taught that there are mysterious little charges and electrons and fluff that snog about and do magic by making things positive and negative with some sort of Hogwarts spell. The smarter the crowd, the more complex the magic, but honestly, it’s all the same thing, just making up a story to explain what we see.

Hence this writing. Yes, this is just another story to explain what we see, but at least this one makes sense, and doesn’t require a dozen or so other even more complex legends to support it.

For starters, the dominant structures found in nature look like spheres. They aren’t really spheres, but that’s what our eyes see and our hands feel. Our eyes are also spheres, so that we can see the dominant structures. Imagine that.

In a world dominated by spherical structures, the notion of plus and minus has no meaning, literally. It’s ambiguous, at least for all points on the surface.

Pick up a marble or ball bearing and try to differentiate two different points on the surface. Good luck. You can’t, unless there is a chip or a variation.  That’s what makes spheres spheres, the total lack of differentiation. So how is plus and minus supposed to work?

What about the shock we get on our tongue from touching a battery, or the bang that happens when lightning strikes?

Are they because somebody stamped magical little +’s and -‘s on stuff?

Nope,

Enter Binary Dimension Theory

In Binary Dimension Theory, all geometry is fractal, and the fractal has a pointy end and a big end. Check out other places in The Pool to find out more.

Everything we perceive as plus or minus or + and – or positive and negative is a direct result of having a pointy end and a big end.  Fractals produce a kind of compression, or expansion, and the difference between the spatial compression and expansion we have labeled Positive and Negative, because it was the first thing that came to mind.

We never really knew what created the positive and negative, we just knew it was there, and so we created legends about how it got there.

In actuality, there are no patchwork of legends required. No magic involved.

Just Binary Dimension Theory. 

It’s really simple, and it works.

Once you see it, things get really easy to understand. Keep reading.

Try to stay positive ok? Ha ha.

 

 

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